"Creativity is thinking up new things. Innovation is doing new things.", Theodore Levitt

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Creativity & Innovations

Title

Beyond postnormal times: The future of creativity and the creativity of the future

Author(s)

Alfonso Montuori

Year of publication

2010

Abstract

Creativity and imagination are the most important ingredients for coping with postnormal times, according to Sardar. This paper looks at the way creativity itself is being transformed in the West, from the individualistic/atomistic view of Modernity towards a more contextual, collaborative, complex approach. It explores the potential and possibilities for this more participatory creativity to help go beyond the ‘‘crisis of the future,’’ and argues that the centrality of creativity must go beyond the mythology of genius and inspiration to inform philosophy, ethics, and action. Philosophical reflection and the imagination of desirable futures can emerge from a creative ethic that stresses the value of generative interactions and contexts that support creativity.

Link (if available)

http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0016328710002405

 

Title

The role of creativity and proactivity on perceived entrepreneurial desirability

Author(s)

Leonidas A. Zampetakis

Year of publication

2008

Abstract

The study tested the extent to which perceived desirability mediates the effects of student creativity and proactivity on entrepreneurial intent. Participantswere 199 engineering and business university students from Greek Universities. Results using Structural Equation Modelling indicated that perceived desirability fully mediates the relationship of student creativity, proactivity and entrepreneurial intent. Additionally, proactivity was found to be related to creativity. The findings have implications for explaining perceived entrepreneurial desirability and direct attention on creativity as an essential competence in the entrepreneurial process.

Link (if available)

http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S187118710800028X

 

Title

Work environment barriers prohibiting creativity

Author(s)

Christian Walter

Year of publication

2012

Abstract

Organizations lacking the ability to enable their workforce to approach their work in creative ways limit the organization’s innovative output and might fall behind their competitors. An explorative approach was taken to determine barriers for creativity in the work environment of a branch of a European technology company based in Thailand. Work environment factors that can decrease creative output were drawn from the componential theory and extended by two categories, namely culture and physical work environment. Some individual categories were found that indirectly relate to the work environment impediments for creativity. Results show that the main barriers were

fear of risk taking, physical work environment, time pressure, autonomy or freedom, and organizational impediments in form of control and internal strife.

Link (if available)

http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1877042812007100

 

Title

Creativity and Innovations in Organizations

Author(s)

Teresa M. Amabile

Year of publication

1996

Abstract

Creativity, the production of new and useful ideas by individuals or teams, can appear in many forms and many functions within firms of all kinds--from entrepreneurial start-ups to well-established enterprises. This note describes the varieties of creativity in organizations, and dispels common myths about what creativity is. Proposes a method for recognizing creativity, outlines the necessary components for individual creativity, and introduces a model of how organizational influences can affect creativity. Critiques some common methods for enhancing creativity, and discusses how creativity can result in innovation.

Link (if available)

http://hbr.org/product/creativity-and-innovation-in-organizations/an/396239-PDF-ENG

 

Title

Highly Inventive Explorer of Creativity: An Interview with John Baer

Author(s)

Suzanna E. Henshon

Year of publication

2009

Abstract

Dr. John Baer is a Professor in the Department of Teacher Education at Rider University. He earned his BA from Yale University (double major, psychology and Japanese studies,

magna cum laude) and his PhD in cognitive and developmental psychology from Rutgers University.

Dr. Baer has published 10 books and scores of research articles and book chapters on creativity, cooperative learning, and other educational psychology topics. His research on the development of creativity and his teaching have both won national awards, including the American Psychological Association’s Berlyne Prize for research on the Psychology of Creativity and the Arts and the National Conference on College Teaching and Learning’s Award for Innovative Excellence in Teaching, Learning, and Technology.

Link (if available)

http://users.rider.edu/~baer/BaerRoeperInterview.pdf

 

Title

When antecedents diverge: Exploring novelty and value as dimensions of creativity

Author(s)

Melissa L. Gruys, Natasha V. Munshi, Todd C. Dewett

Year of publication

2011

Abstract

Though an ongoing debate exists concerning how creativity should be defined and measured, it is generally agreed upon that creativity is the generation of ideas that are novel and of value (Amabile, 1996; Hennessey & Amabile, 2010). Yet most studies treat creativity as a black box in regards to the nature of the relationships between some commonly known antecedents of creativity and its two prime components, namely novelty and value. This is the issue we address in this exploratory paper as we look at antecedents that are similarly related and differentially related to novelty and value. We propose that such relationships could have an impact on creative outcomes in organizations. We also discuss potential implications for broader application to practitioners interested in learning how to boost their employee creativity and organizational innovativeness.

Link (if available)

http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/detailmini.jsp?_nfpb=true&_&ERICExtSearch_SearchValue_0=EJ928707&ERICExtSearch_SearchType_0=no&accno=EJ928707

 

Title

On the relationship between individual creativity and time management

Author(s)

Leonidas A. Zampetakisa, Nancy Bourantab, Vassilis S. Moustakis

Year of publication

2009

Abstract

The article investigates the relationship between time management behaviours and attitudes with measures of creativity, as assessed by self-rated creativity and a measure of creative personality. Additionally, total creativity is examined, as the sum of the two creativity constructs when z-scored. Using data from a survey of 186 participants, results suggest that creativity is positively related to daily planning behaviour, confidence on long-range planning, perceived control of time and tenacity and negatively related to preference for disorganization. These results have theoretical implications for understanding how creativity relates to time management. Implications of the results are considered and future research directions identified.

Link (if available)

http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1871187109000716

 

Title

Paradigms in the study of creativity: Introducing the perspective of cultural psychology

Author(s)

Vlad Petre Gl_aveanu

Year of publication

2009

Abstract

This article identifies three paradigms in creativity theory and research in psychology. The He-paradigm, focused on the solitary genius, has been followed, mainly after the 1950s, by the I-paradigm, equally individualistic in nature but attributing creativity to each and every individual. Extending this view, the We-paradigm incorporates what became known as the social psychology of creativity. The cultural psychology of creativity builds upon this last theoretical approach while being critical of some of its assumptions.

This relatively new perspective, using the conceptual and methodological framework of cultural psychology, investigates the sociocultural roots and dynamics of all our creative acts and employs a tetradic framework of self – community – new artifact – existing artifacts in its conceptualization of creativity. The theoretical basis of the cultural psychology approach is analyzed as well as some of its main implications for both the understanding and study of creativity.

Link (if available)

http://eprints.lse.ac.uk/29334/

 

Title

Examining variations among researchers’ and teachers’ conceptualizations of creativity: A review and synthesis of contemporary research

Author(s)

AndriaAndiliou, P. Karen Murphy

Year of publication

2010

Abstract

Research exploring beliefs about creativity has produced valuable findings regarding how individuals conceptualize creativity, yet, to date, there has been no systematic synthesis of this literature. As such, the purposes of this review were twofold: (a) to explore researchers’

and teachers’ conceptualizations of creativity; and, (b) to analyze and synthesize the results

of the studies examining teachers’ beliefs about creativity. To address these purposes, we analyzed peer-reviewed, empirical research studies of teachers’ beliefs about creativity appearing in the published literature. Our analysis incorporated documentation of the studies’

surface characteristics (i.e., topic, sample, design, and instruments) and identification of definitional patterns regarding the two key terms of the review namely creativity and beliefs. Based on our analysis of the reviewed studies, we propose a conceptual framework for beliefs about creativity, and overview conceptual issues derived from themes emerging in the relevant literature. Implications for instruction and research are forwarded.

Link (if available)

http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1747938X10000412

 

Title

Theories of Creativity

Author(s)

Aaron Kozbelt, Ronald A. Begheuo, and Mark A. Runco

Year of publication

1990

Abstract

Moderation and Pluralism in Considering Theories of Creativity

Classifying and Comparing Theories

Classifying Theory Types and Orientations

Link (if available)

http://pages.uoregon.edu/beghetto/CreativityTheories%28Kozbelt,Beghetto%26Runco%29.pdf

 

Title

Creativity

Author(s)

Mark A. Runco

Year of publication

2004

Abstract

Creativity has clear benefits for individuals and society as a whole. Not surprisingly, a great deal of research has focused on creativity, especially in the past 20 years. This chapter reviews the creativity research, first looking to the relevant traits, capacities, influences, and products, and then within disciplinary perspectives on creativity (e.g., biological, cognitive, developmental, organizational). Great headway is being made in creativity research, but more dialogue between perspectives is suggested.

New and important areas of research are highlighted, and the various costs and benefits

of creativity are discussed.

Link (if available)

http://homes.ieu.edu.tr/~dhasirci/Hasirci-ARTICLES/Citation.pdf

 

Title

Explaining Creativity: The Science of Human Innovation

Author(s)

R. Keith Sawyer

Year of publication

2006

Abstract

Explaining Creativity is an accessible introduction to the latest scientific research on creativity. The book summarizes and integrates a broad range of research in psychology and related scientific fields. In the last 40 years, psychologists, anthropologists, and sociologists have devoted increased attention to creativity; we now know more about creativity than at any point in history. Explaining Creativity considers not only arts like painting and writing, but also science, stage performance, business innovation, and creativity in everyday life.

Sawyer's approach is interdisciplinary. In addition to examining psychological studies on creativity, he draws on anthropologists' research on creativity in non-Western cultures, sociologists' research on the situations, contexts, and networks of creative activity, and cognitive neuroscientists' studies of the brain. He moves beyond the individual to consider the social and cultural contexts of creativity, including the role of collaboration in the creative process.

Link (if available)

http://ascc.artsci.wustl.edu/~ksawyer/explainingcreativity/

 

Title

Evolutionary Approaches to Creativity

Author(s)

J. Kaufman, R. Sternberg, Liane Gabora, Scott Barry Kaufman

Year of publication

-

Abstract

Human creativity is unique in that it has completely transformed the planet we live on. We build skyscrapers, play breathtaking cello sonatas, send ourselves into space, and even decode our own DNA. Given that the anatomy of the human brain is not so different from that of the great apes, what enables us to be so creative? Recent collaborations at the frontier of anthropology, archaeology, psychology, and cognitive science are culminating in speculative but increasingly sophisticated efforts to piece together the answer to this question. Examining the skeletons of our ancestors gives cues as to anatomical constraints that hindered or made possible various kinds of creative expression. Relics of the past have much to tell us about the thoughts, beliefs, and creative abilities of the people who invented and used them. How the spectacular creativity of humans came about is the first topic addressed in this chapter.

Link (if available)

http://arxiv.org/ftp/arxiv/papers/1106/1106.3386.pdf

 

Non-formal & Informal Learning / WEB 2.0

Title

Has Web 2.0 Revitalized Informal Learning?: Correlation between Web 2.0 Level and Extreme Learning

Author(s)

Donggil Song

Junghun Lee

Year of publication

2012

Abstract

With the development of new technology including Web 2.0, people can learn anywhere/anytime even in extreme situations. Extreme learning (often called informal or nontraditional learning) means that people learn or teach using new technology in unusual or nontraditional ways, such as from transportations, non-educational places, or virtual worlds. The present study aims at investigating the relationship between the Web 2.0 level and the evaluation of extreme learning websites. For this purpose, fifty five extreme learning websites were selected and their Web 2.0 levels were rated in terms of eight criteria of Web 2.0 proposed in the literature. In addition, previously examined extreme learning evaluation results were employed. The correlation analysis shows that there is a positive relationship between Web 2.0 features and extreme learning website ratings.

Link (if available)

http://www.einbrain.com/pds/papers/2012_DSong_HasWeb2RevitalizedInformalLearning.pdf

 

This project has been funded with support from the European Commission. This publication
reflects the views only of the author, and the Commission cannot be held responsible for any
use which may be made of the information contained therein.

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